Indulge in reminiscence – The Crispin Glover Experience

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In 2009, as part of Night Visions Film Festival in Helsinki, I went to see what was titled as The Crispin Glover Experience. It consisted of

Crispin Hellion Glover’s Big Slide Show

It was essentially a very intense hour of Crispin Glover discussing his art and life. I have very litte memory of what was said, but it was intense.

– A screening of What is it?

I think he was originally supposed to show It is fine! EVERYTHING IS FINE. but it was changed for some reason that I can’t recall. I remember watching the trailers for both films before the show and thinking “Well, I’ve seen avant-garde films and pretty weird stuff before, at least it’ll be interesting.” I was not prepared for what ensued.

–  A Q&A session

I think this went on for an hour or maybe two. It certainly felt like forever. Glover is very good at directing the conversation to where he wants it to go, so people asked their questions and Glover steamrolled to what ever aspect of his life or art he felt like discussing further. In a very polite manner, of course.

– Book signing/ meet & greet

I did not stay for this, I wanted to, but I was physically and mentally spent at this point. The line was insane and four hours of the experience was enough for me.

The details of the event escape me, but I will never forget it nor will I ever forget what Crispin Glover was like in person. I’m really glad that I went, it was a unique experience. It was also one the most exhausting things that I’ve ever experienced in my life and I would never do it again. That being said, if you have a chance to see one his shows, go & see it. It is, after all, your density.

In the meanwhile, I suggest you watch episode #15 of No Small Parts featuring Crispin Glover. It is as entertaining as it is educational, another fine episode in the series.

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Imagine Waking Up Tomorrow and Your Favourite Band Has Disappeared

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I straight up love Bill Drummond. Hands down. Or up, which ever way you prefer. My love for him dates back to the days of The KLF. Obviously my understanding of what he and Jimmy Cauty were trying to do was pretty limited at the time as I was in my early teens but I read every interview I could get my hands on and bought the music. This was still pretty early days for internet, as you might or might not remember and I lived on the outskirts of an outskirts country.

However, I have a strong recollection that even then, at least on some level, I realised Bill and Jimmy were doing something very different. Same in some ways as some other bands but different in a very fundamental way. Their meta level of recognising what they were doing and how they were doing it was mindblowing for my teenage brain. And I loved their music and all the mythology they had wrapped around it. And then, of course, they burned the million pounds and pretty much called it quits. Look it up or watch the film. I was devastated.

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Recently I had the chance to see Imagine Waking Up Tomorrow and All Music Has Disappeared. The documentary follows Bill Drummond as he travels around for his latest project, The17. I might not completely share Bill’s views on how the accessibility of music destroys the value we place on the experience of listening to music, but I get it. I get what you’re getting at, Bill.

If you haven’t seen the film, go and see it now. Or at least listen to some KLF.

I love you, Bill.


Colour In Storytelling

Check out Channel Criswell for more of his video essays on film.

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Cardiac Wallpaper

Hand screen printed in the UK. Available for purchase at Street Anatomy Gallery Store.


Surface to Structure origami exhibition

“Vole,” 2013, by Bernie Peyton, USA. Photographed by Christopher Bierlein.

 

Surface to Structure: Folded Forms is an exhibition of origami artwork that brings together the work of 88 artists spanning five continents.  The 134 works in the show encapsulate a broad spectrum of origami’s possibilities, both artistic and scientific, and push the perceptions of this art form beyond its traditional boundaries.

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“Constrained Bowl,” 2012, by Linda Smith, USA. Photographed by Christopher Bierlein.

“Phoenix,” 2012, by Satoshi Kamiya, Japan. Photographed by Christopher Bierlein.

“Fluid Dynamic,” 2013, by Richard Swee­ney, UK. Photographed by Christopher Bierlein.

“Ciérbol,” 2013, by Victor Coeurjoly, Spain. Photographed by Christopher Bierlein.

On view until July 3, 2014, 11AM–10PM every day. Free. See details here.

 

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Serpent d’océan

Huang Yong Ping’s giant sea snake skeleton on the French seaside.


#LionelStitchie

Lionel Richie-lyrics stitched on abandoned furniture.

 

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