For the love of Miami Vice #8

Time for some ghetto fabulous shenanigans combined with a colour-coordinated musical montage.


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Hey folks, sorry it’s been dead around here lately. RIP old computer.

 

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American Scary

Check out this documentary film about a dying breed, the horror host.

From the official website:

American Scary is a look at the nation’s tradition of horror hosting, from Zacherley to A. Ghastlee Ghoul.

 Hosts of all kinds were once a staple of television, and especially local television productions. But as production demands and the availability of cheaper syndicated material changed the local TV business model, local hosts were also one of the first things to go, no matter how popular they were with the viewing public.

 With interviews and footage from major hosts from the 1950s to the present day, such as Zacherley, Vampira, Ghoulardi and others, along with memories from celebrities and fans who were influenced by these hosts, you’ll follow this American folk art form from its glamorous beginnings, through repeated waves of popularity in the 1960s and 1970s, to its scrappy resurgence and survival in the current age of cable access and the Internet.

 American Scary looks to remind people how much fun local TV could be – and maybe could be again.

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Double Dare

I remember reading about Double Dare some time ago but never actually got around to watching it for whatever reason. I’m glad I finally did, as it is every bit as insightful as it is entertaining and simply amazing. It focuses on two women, Jeannie Epper, a legendary stunt woman and a stunt coordinator and Zoë Bell, who started as a stunt double for Lucy Lawless in Xena: Warrior Princess and has since established her career in Hollywood by appearing in such films as Kill Bill, Death Proof and Inglourious Basterds, doing stunts as well as acting. The documentary  follows the two as they negotiate their way in the film industry and in a highly demanding profession. These are tough ladies and the film isn’t bad either. If you haven’t already seen it, watch it now. Trailer below.

BONUS: a short documentary about Zoë Bell.  Funnily enough, Tarantino’s decision to give Bell one of the female leads in Death Proof was strongly influenced by Double Dare and seeing her reaction to the news about getting the job as Uma Thurman’s stunt double. Watch it all unfold below.  This woman is an absolute legend.


For the love of Miami Vice #7

Busting moves with Suicidal Tendencies. That is one happening club.


Photos to die for

Revolver camera: a Colt 38 carrying a small camera that automatically takes a picture when you pull the trigger. From  Dutch National Archives Flickr stream, this killer shot dates back to 1938 New York.

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A brief history of the Minimoog

Check out this short documentary about the history of the Minimoog and its contributions to popular music. First installment in a series, more info here.

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